role models

positive messages about the benefits of using augmentative and alternative communication (AAC)


 

Making connections: veterans without speech master the art of conversation and living

Murphy, P. (2009), 'Making connections: veterans without speech master the art of conversation and living'. PN, December 2009, pp.30-35.

A magazine article about US veterans forced by complex disabilities to relearn many things, including the art of conversation.

KEYWORDS: hobbies, relationships, inner strength, employment

 

AttachmentSize
employment-open-making_connections__veterans.pdf1.98 MB

Networking towards employment: Experiences of people who use augmentative and alternative communication

TitleNetworking towards employment: Experiences of people who use augmentative and alternative communication
Publication TypeJournal Article
AbstractDespite research that has documented the powerful role of social networks for obtaining employment, only recently has this issue been explored for people with disabilities. Drawing on qualitative data gathered from 38 individuals with severe communication disabilities who use augmentative and alternative communication (AAC), this study explores the ways in which individuals who use AAC built and used their networks to search for and obtain employment. Thirty-four of the participants used network contacts in their search for employment. The use of "weak ties," such as colleagues and acquaintances, and participation in professional, disability-related, and social activities emerged as common mechanisms for developing job-related networks and for job searching. Networks were perceived as helping the participants overcome some barriers to obtaining employment and as enhancing the likelihood of obtaining flexible, meaningful, and satisfying jobs.
AuthorsCarey, A. C., Potts B. B., Bryen D. N., and Shankar J.
Year of Publication2004
Date PublishedSpr
PublicationResearch and Practice for Persons with Severe Disabilities
Volume29
Issue1
Pages40-52
ISSN0274-9483 (print), 1540-7969 (electronic)
Publisher DOIhttp://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/tash/rpsd
Reseach NotesThis article is not included in publisher link!
Keywords (MeSH)adult, communication aids for disabled, communication disorders, disabled persons, employment, social networking, social support

The Speech Generating Device (SGD) Mentoring Program: Supporting the Development of People Learning to Use an SGD

TitleThe Speech Generating Device (SGD) Mentoring Program: Supporting the Development of People Learning to Use an SGD
Publication TypeJournal Article
AbstractMentoring in speech generating device (SGD) use by adults who use an SGD proficiently offers the potential to improve the device usage of people learning an SGD. The aim of the present study was to examine the impact of SGD mentoring on the mentees’ SGD usage. Three mentors, aged 23, 31, and 54 years, and three mentees, aged 13, 14, and 32 years, participated. A nonconcurrent multiple baseline across participants design was used to assess the outcomes. Mentee conversation samples were analyzed for the number of total words, the number of different words, and the number of bound morphemes produced in mentoring sessions. Improvements were made in these measures across the mentees following commencement of mentoring sessions with a trained SGD mentor. These results provide preliminary evidence of SGD mentoring success.
AuthorsBallin, L., Balandin S., and Stancliffe R. J.
Year of Publication2013
PublicationJournal of Developmental and Physical Disabilities
Volume25
Issue4
Pages437-459
ISSN1056-263X (print), 1573-3580 (online)
Publisher DOIhttp://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10882-012-9322-0
Keywords (MeSH)adult, communication aids for disabled, mentors

The speech generating device (SGD) mentoring programme: an evaluation by participants

TitleThe speech generating device (SGD) mentoring programme: an evaluation by participants
Publication TypeJournal Article
AbstractPurpose: In this paper the perceptions of three mentors and three mentees who took part in a speech generating device (SGD) mentoring programme are presented. The aims of the study were to investigate the participants’ views on taking part in the mentoring programme and their satisfaction with the outcomes. Method: Information was gathered through semi-structured interviews with the six mentoring programme participants. Interview data were analysed for content themes. Results: Thematic analysis revealed six themes. Of these themes, five were identified in both the mentor and mentee’s data. These themes were: satisfaction with the SGD mentoring programme, mentee improvement in SGD use, the importance of a role model of SGD use, the SGD mentoring relationship as a helping relationship, and SGD mentoring contributes to mentor self-esteem. The remaining theme, mentors who use an SGD learn from the mentoring experience, was generated from the mentor’s data only. Conclusions: The results of this study provide initial evidence in support of mentoring among people who use an SGD. A total of five of the six participants perceived that people learning an SGD can benefit from SGD mentoring by experienced users of SGDs and agreed on a need for such mentoring programmes to improve SGD use.
AuthorsBallin, L., Balandin S., and Stancliffe R. J.
Year of Publication2013
PublicationDisability and Rehabilitation: Assistive Technology
Volume8
Issue3
Pages195-203
ISSN1748-3107 (print), 1748-3115 (online)
Publisher DOIhttp://informahealthcare.com/doi/abs/10.3109/17483107.2012.699586
Keywords (MeSH)adolescent, adult, attitude of health personnel, mentors, patient satisfaction, professional-patient relations, speech disorders, young adult