Navbar
Content

age-school age

Communication Opportunities for Elementary School Students who use Augmentative and Alternative Communication (summary)

Communication
Opportunities
 
for
School Children
 
who
 
use
AAC

Background

Children with complex communication needs (CCN) often continue to experience educational and social barriers even after they have received appropriate augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) systems. This means that opportunities to communicate functionally need to be created and supported in the children’s natural environments including schools.

Tags: 
Tags: 
Tags: 
Tags: 
Tags: 
Tags: 
Tags: 
Tags: 

Communication Opportunities for Elementary School Students who use Augmentative and Alternative Communication (short summary)

Communication
Opportunities
 
for
School Children
 
who
 
use
AAC

Children with complex communication needs (CCN) often continue to experience educational and social barriers even after they have received appropriate augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) systems.

It is known that in interactions involving people who use AAC the naturally speaking partner tends to be dominant and take the lead, usually by asking a lot of direct questions. Children who use AAC often have limited opportunities to initiate new topics of conversation instructions and the majority of interactions are with adults not peers.

Tags: 
Tags: 
Tags: 
Tags: 
Tags: 
Tags: 
Tags: 
Tags: 

Communication Opportunities for Elementary School Students who use Augmentative and Alternative Communication (short summary)

Children with complex communication needs (CCN) often continue to experience educational and social barriers even after they have received appropriate augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) systems.

It is known that in interactions involving people who use AAC the naturally speaking partner tends to be dominant and take the lead, usually by asking a lot of direct questions. Children who use AAC often have limited opportunities to initiate new topics of conversation instructions and the majority of interactions are with adults not peers.

Tags: 
Tags: 
Tags: 
Tags: 
Tags: 
Tags: 
Tags: 
Tags: 

Communication Opportunities for Elementary School Students who use Augmentative and Alternative Communication (short summary)

Children with complex communication needs (CCN) often continue to experience educational and social barriers even after they have received appropriate augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) systems.

It is known that in interactions involving people who use AAC the naturally speaking partner tends to be dominant and take the lead, usually by asking a lot of direct questions. Children who use AAC often have limited opportunities to initiate new topics of conversation instructions and the majority of interactions are with adults not peers.

Tags: 
Tags: 
Tags: 
Tags: 
Tags: 
Tags: 
Tags: 
Tags: 

The Vocabulary of Beginning Writers: Implications for Children with Complex Communication Needs (summary)

 
The
Vocabulary
 
of
Young
Writers:
Implications
 
for
Children
 
with
 
CCN

Background

This study explored vocabulary used in typical written language development and whether knowledge about this could be applied to developing vocabulary sets for children with complex communication needs (CCN).

Tags: 
Tags: 
Tags: 
Tags: 
Tags: 

The Vocabulary of Beginning Writers: Implications for Children with Complex Communication Needs (short summary)

 
The
Vocabulary
 
of
Young
Writers:
Implications
 
for
Children
 
with
 
CCN

This study investigated the vocabulary used in the self-selected writing of typically developing young school age children in USA and New Zealand and considered whether the information gathered could be beneficial in selecting vocabulary available on augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) systems to support the development of writing for children with complex communication needs (CCN).

It was found that a small core vocabulary accounted for a large percentage of the written work and this was largely grammatical words.

Tags: 
Tags: 
Tags: 
Tags: 
Tags: 

Acquisition, Preference and Follow-up Comparison Across Three AAC Modalities Taught to Two Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (summary)

Use
 
of
Three
 
Types
 
of
AAC
 
by
Children
 
with
Autism

Background

Many people diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) fail to develop enough speech to meet their everyday communication needs. Augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) has been used successfully with some of this population. Possible AAC strategies for children with ASD include the use of manual signing, picture exchange and speech generating devices (SGDs). This leads to the question of which of these systems should be taught to any individual.

Tags: 
Tags: 
Tags: 
Tags: 
Tags: 
Tags: 
Tags: 
Syndicate content