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The Vocabulary of Beginning Writers: Implications for Children with Complex Communication Needs (short summary)

 
The
Vocabulary
 
of
Young
Writers:
Implications
 
for
Children
 
with
 
CCN

This study investigated the vocabulary used in the self-selected writing of typically developing young school age children in USA and New Zealand and considered whether the information gathered could be beneficial in selecting vocabulary available on augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) systems to support the development of writing for children with complex communication needs (CCN).

It was found that a small core vocabulary accounted for a large percentage of the written work and this was largely grammatical words.

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Acquisition, Preference and Follow-up Comparison Across Three AAC Modalities Taught to Two Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (summary)

Use
 
of
Three
 
Types
 
of
AAC
 
by
Children
 
with
Autism

Background

Many people diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) fail to develop enough speech to meet their everyday communication needs. Augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) has been used successfully with some of this population. Possible AAC strategies for children with ASD include the use of manual signing, picture exchange and speech generating devices (SGDs). This leads to the question of which of these systems should be taught to any individual.

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Acquisition, Preference and Follow-up Comparison Across Three AAC Modalities Taught to Two Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (short summary)

Use
 
of
Three
 
Types
 
of
AAC
 
by
Children
 
with
Autism

In this study, related to McLay et al 2015, the authors investigated whether two boys with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) could be taught to request continuation of toy play using ‘more’ using three different augmentative and alternative communication systems; signing, picture exchange and a speech generating device (SGD), whether this learning would be maintained over time and whether they would show a preference for any of the AAC systems over the others.

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The Effects of PECS Teaching to Phase III on the Communicative Interactions between Children with Autism and their Teachers (summary)

 
The
 
Effects
of
PECS
Teaching
 
on
Interactions
 
between
Children
 
with
Autism
 
and
 
their
Teachers

Background

The majority of young children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) have limited or no spoken language when they start school at around the age of 5. It has been suggested that up to two-thirds never acquire useful spoken language.

Teaching speech to this group can be a very lengthy process and throughout this children do not have an effective means of communication.

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The Effects of PECS Teaching to Phase III on the Communicative Interactions between Children with Autism and their Teachers (short summary)

 
The
 
Effects
 
of
PECS
Teaching
 
on
Interactions
 
between
Children
 
with
Autism
 
and
 
their
Teachers

The majority of young children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) have limited or no spoken language when they start school at around the age of 5. It has been suggested that up to two-thirds never acquire useful spoken language.

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Teaching Early Numeracy Skills Using Single Switch Voice-Output Devices to Students with Severe Multiple Disabilities (summary)

Teaching
 
early
numeracy
 
using
 
single
switch
VOCAs
 
to
students
 
with
 
severe
 
multiple
disabilities

Background

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Teaching Early Numeracy Skills Using Single Switch Voice-Output Devices to Students with Severe Multiple Disabilities (short summary)

Teaching
 
early
numeracy
 
using
 
single
switch
VOCAs
 
to
students
 
with
 
severe
 
multiple
disabilities

The authors of this paper investigated the ‘effect of a systematic instructional package with individualized adaptations on the acquisition of numeracy skills’ on students with multiple disabilities. The research involved three children with severe multiple disabilities and complex communication needs (CCN) who attended a special school.

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Initial Insights into Phoneme Awareness Intervention for Children with Complex Communication Needs (summary)

 
Insights
 
into
 
Phoneme
Awareness
Intervention
 
for
Children
 
with
Complex
Communication
Needs

Background

Phoneme awareness is the ability to recognise and manipulate the individual sounds in spoken words and is part of the broader phonological awareness that is essential to the development of early reading skills. Children with complex communication needs (CCN) often have significant and long-term difficulties in the development of literacy; poor phoneme awareness has been suggested as possibly limiting their word recognition and spelling skills.

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Initial Insights into Phoneme Awareness Intervention for Children with Complex Communication Needs (short summary)

 
Insights
into
 
phoneme
 
awareness
 
intervention
 
for
children
 
with
complex
communication
needs

This study aimed to determine if phoneme awareness skills can be taught to children with complex communication needs (CCN), to observe any transfer effects to tasks that were not directly targeted during the intervention and to their ability to produce and record written words.

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Teaching Graphic Symbol Combinations to Children with Limited Speech During Shared Story Reading (summary)

Use
of
symbols
by
young children

Background

The use of graphic symbols can be helpful for children who do not develop enough spoken language to meet their communication needs but it is not always easy to combine symbols into messages of more than one word, particularly for those children whose understanding of spoken language is also delayed. There could be a number of reasons for this.

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