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stroke-CVA

medical term for sudden loss of sensation and control caused by rupture or obstruction of a blood vessel of the brain e.g. a blood clot; may be referred to as CVA - cerebrovascular accident

Using different methods to communicate: how adults with severe acquired communication difficulties make decisions about the communication methods they use and how they experience them (summary)

Using
different
methods
 
to
communicate

Background

It is recognised that assistive technologies, including augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) can be beneficial in helping improve the quality of life for adults with complex needs. People with acquired communication difficulties have to make many decisions about new technologies and also learn how to use them.

Involving communication aid users in decision making about which systems to use and in what situations is known to be beneficial but does not always happen.

Using different methods to communicate: how adults with severe acquired communication difficulties make decisions about the communication methods they use and how they experience them (short summary)

Using
different
methods
 
to
communicate

The researchers interviewed several men with acquired neurological disorders about their choice of augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) methods. They found that the choice of method used to communicate is individual and professionals need to take this into consideration when working with clients with acquired neurological conditions. Often different methods will be chosen for different situations and communication partners.

Augmentative and alternative communication in daily clinical practice: strategies and tools for management of severe communication disorders (summary)

Use
of
AAC
after
a
stroke

Background

People who have had strokes often use natural speech in combination with various AAC strategies to improve the effectiveness of their communication. These strategies might change over time as communication needs change.

Interventions to help build stroke patients' communicative competence need to consider a wide variety of factors including the individual, their environments and their communication partners. They should not necessarily be seeking a 'cure', rather to implement strategies to compensate for difficulties.

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Augmentative and alternative communication in daily clinical practice: strategies and tools for management of severe communication disorders (short summary)

Use
of
AAC
after
a
stroke

This paper looks at the use of AAC with people who have had a stroke. Possible reasons for abandonment or unwillingness to use AAC systems are considered. The authors describe various elements of communicative competence that need to be taken into account when working with stroke patients and their families and carers and emphasise that the needs of people with severe communication impairments are diverse, as are considerations to be taken in identifying possible support systems.

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Light Technology Augmentative Communication for Acute Care and Rehab Settings (summary)

Low
technology
AAC
after
stroke

Background

Therapists working in hospital settings with patients who have recently had a stroke try both to improve the patient's ability to communicate functionally and to give strategies to help compensate for communication difficulties that might remain.

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